9/8 | Tatsuya Nakatani Gong Orchestra @ Art In

Fri, 9/8 | 8pm $12 @ Art In

1444 E Washington Ave, Madison, Wisconsin 53703

Tone Madison presents:

Tatsuya Nakatani Gong Orchestra

Pennsylvania-based avant-garde percussion master Nakatani returns, this time leading a large ensemble of local musicians playing gongs. The Gong Orchestra uses Nakatani’s bowing techniques to create an otherworldly array of harmonics and textures. It’s a gorgeous, powerful sonic experience you won’t want to miss.

$10 presale, $12 day of, $8 for Tone Madison sustainers (patreon.com/toneMSN)

(September 5th) Update!

Curator’s notes by Scott Gordon via Tone MSN


CD Release: BC Grimm “Orbis Obscura” available via Other Obscura records

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Buy “Orbis Obscura” CD/Digital worldwide for $10 from Other Obscura record label

“Orbis Obscura” is a 35 minute “sci-fi tone poem” for Pipa (Chinese lute) with delay & fuzz pedals by BC Grimm. Now available world wide on CD & Digital from Other Obscura Records! Other Obscura is a label promoting the compositions and improvisations of artists in Milwaukee, Madison and the surrounding areas. Est. 2016.


ORBIS OBSCURA REVIEWS

From Tone Madison, 8/10:
Brian Grimm is something of an experimental-music powerhouse in Madison.”; ” …one of the most sonically untethered things Grimm has put out there so far—which is saying something, and also not a complaint. He uses this eccentric but relatively stripped-down setup to veer through an array of warmly distorted drones, sticky pulsating rhythms, and layers of scratchy texture. The release is also the first from a new Madison- and Milwaukee-focused label, Other Obscura”     

— Scott Gordon, Tone Madison

From Isthmus Daily Page, 8/12:
 Madison composer and cellist Brian Grimm’s meditative, experimental soundscapes blend modern improvisational styles with ancient Chinese string instrument technique. …Prepare to be transported into a beautiful dream.

From Dayz Of Purple And Orange, 8/15:
” – a totally immersive, blissed-out trip that transports the listener away to distant climes…simply beautiful!”; “…glimmers of ‘sci-fi’ noises bleed through the drones. Over the course of the 35 minutes it totally immerses the listener in wave upon wave of gorgeous drones and otherworldly noises – utterly bewitching. (read: full review)     

— Andy Uzzell, Dayz Of Purple And Orange


BC Grimm

Cellist & composer Brian Grimm grew up surrounded by Chinese string instruments of every sort. After initial lessons in Chinese music with Yang Wei (pipa) & Daxun Zhang (bass) of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silkroad Enesemble, he was lucky to then study guqin (zither), pipa (lute), gaohu (fiddle) & daruan (bass lute) in Hong Kong with members of the 香港中樂團 Hong Kong Chinese OrchestraWuji Ensemble 無極樂團. Over the last 15 years Grimm has developed a deep language of Free Improvisation & Composition with groups such as The Brothers Grimm, Lovely Socialite, and Brennan Connors & Stray Passage. In conjunction with performing & teaching, Brian runs GrimmusiK Records – a label for all projects involving him & his brother AJ (classical & flamenco guitar).

BCG on cello + pipa by John Hiller Brumbaugh

BCG on cello + pipa by John Hiller Brumbaugh


 

Isthmus | The Daily Page | Scott Gordon on Evolution of Madison Music 2012

How Madison venues, labels and performers have evolved in 2012

– Isthmus | The Daily Page

“Year-end lists tend to be nice and trim, while local music is messy: provincial yet sprawling, repetitive yet ever-changing, frustrating yet exciting. To provide some perspective, I’ll discuss a few factors that altered Madison’s music community in 2012, and what these changes mean for the future.

Changes at local concert venues — from the most ornate old theater to the scrappiest little DIY space — touched almost everyone this year. After struggling with structural decay and feuding management, the Orpheum Theatre landed in foreclosure. As great as the Orpheum is, it’s brought us some horrors in recent years, such as a shoddy, awkwardly high concert stage and dead-of-winter movie screenings with the heat turned off. I’m thankful that the competent, Madison-based concert promoter Frank Productions is at least temporarily taking over. Frank will reopen the venue with a New Year’s Eve show featuring local rock band Hometown Sweethearts and DJs VONMad Major Melvin and Wyatt Agard, and has booked some big-name acts for 2013, including Passion Pit and Yonder Mountain String Band. But it remains to be seen if the company will tackle the costly, long-term renovations the Orpheum deserves.

The uncertainty hasn’t spared small venues, either. The all-agesProject Lodge left its East Johnson Street space this fall and has yet to find a new location. The tiny Dragonfly Lounge became a surprisingly important venue for local and regional bands, thanks to a few musicians’ dogged booking efforts, which will continuewith the Lost City Winter Series.

Darwin Sampson, owner of the small downtown club the Frequency, recently announced a business partnership with Matt Gerding and Scott Leslie of the Majestic Theatre, who have funded a sound-system upgrade and will assume a greater role in booking. The Majestic has already started booking and promoting shows at small local venues such as Redamte Coffee House, the Loft at the Goodman Community Center, and East Main Street’s Anglophile-themed joint, the Rigby. It’s not clear how much they’ll shift the Frequency’s offerings away from local bands and toward more lucrative touring acts.

Sampson recently told me that Madison musicians may have too many opportunities to perform, and that shows booked too close together can dilute the draw of these acts. Often, he says, a local band will play for free at a place like Mickey’s Tavern just a week or two before a Frequency show, making it harder to bring in cover charges and alcohol sales that, ultimately, keep live music afloat. Still, I sense that local bands are frustrated with traditional venues. As the year went on, I noticed more and more shows at houses, the bike shop Revolution Cycles and the new art space Bright Red Studios. A recording studio, Audio for the Arts, also brought in a small but dedicated following as it hosted the Surrounded By Reality experimental-jazz series.

Whether I was attending a show at the Dragonfly, Mickey’s or someone’s apartment, I found it hard to overlook the productivity of Madison’s avant-garde musicians. One of the acts I saw most frequently was Spiral Joy Band, who use fiddles, harmonium and sometimes even gongs to summon drone-based pieces of exhausting length. During a residency at the Dragonfly before two members moved away from Madison, free-jazz trio Glacier collaborated live with all sorts of musicians, from sax and flute improviser Hanah Jon Taylor to tabla player Todd Hammes. At State Street’s Dobra Tea, I kicked off my shoes and sat on a pillow to watch Madison throat-singer DB Pedersen and the avant-classical Watercourse Quartet perform an improvisational one-off.

Madisonians should also take heart in the music community’s entrepreneurial spirit. While everyone and their mother have started a record label, the folks behind Madison’s Brave MysteriesKind Turkey and Mine All Mine labels behaved like true go-getters, recruiting artists from our city and beyond. Madison’s Ankur Malhotra helped launch Amarrass Records, a label centering on traditional Indian musicians, and trekked into the deserts of Rajahstan to record them. Even theMadison Mallards delved into live music in August, successfully launching the Pondamoniumfestival, which featured the Flaming Lips and Garbage.

As always, a strange, mismatched bunch of people steered Madison music in 2012. That can make things unpredictable, but it might also be our town’s greatest musical asset.”

~ Scott Gordon 12.06.12 Isthmus | The Daily Page