Cello Zone! Pirastro Eudoxa String Review (for 1st time buyers) Part 1

Detail 1: Three different ways to secure your gut string to the ebony tailpiece. C & G strings are looped, like viola da gamba or classical guitar. D-string is laced, with the knot catching underneith the tailpiece. Eudoxa A-stings have a ball end with a thick cushy washer, so I have it saddled in the fine-tuner.

String Gauges for Part 1

the “Isseralis” set up

  • a1 Eudoxa medium gauge 21 PM / 1.05mm (sheep gut core, aluminum wound)
  • d2 Eudoxa medium gauge 24 PM / 1.2mm (sheep gut core, silver/aluminum wound)
  • G3 Eudoxa heavy gauge 27 PM / 1.35mm (sheep gut core, silver wound)
  • C4 Oliv light gauge 36 PM / 1.8mm (sheep gut core, silver wound)

I recently had a month away from my cello while it was being repaired for some damages caused by United Airlines (more on that in another post). During the interim, I was researching both plain and wound gut strings to outfit my cello(s) with. It became clear that a lot of my heroes – Pau Casals, Jacqueline Du Pré, Daniil Shafran, Steven Isserlis – used wound gut strings. It was high time I gave it a try.

Now, I don’t know which gauges British cellist Steven Isserlis uses… but I know that his set up is Pirastro Eudoxa for a1, d2, G3 – and Pirastro Oliv for C4. Isserlis is a benchmark among modern cellists for the tone he draws from the cello. He is famous not only for his wonderful performances of cello repertoire, but also for his decades long use of Eudoxa strings, handmade by Pirastro in Germany. If it’s good enough for him, then it’s certainly good enough for me!

The new strings have been on for a three weeks now. I love the tone they produce, there is a complex, vocal quality to it. They feel nice under the fingers and allow you to sculpt each note. This is exactly the sort of color and depth I felt was lacking from my steel string set ups. It’s a robust round sound, rich in harmonic content and full of resonance. Quite honestly, they are much louder than I anticipated. I know the stereotype is that gut strings are quieter than steel, and maybe this is more to do with projection or is about steel vs plain/open gut … but I must say that on *my cello, these wound gut strings are actually louder than the steel string set ups. *Loudness results may vary from cello to cello… I’m having the opposite problem, I can’t seem to play quietly enough. So much so that I’ve had complaints from my upstairs neighbors about the volume being too loud when I am practicing.

Initially, the G/C strings seemed too stiff and limited in their range of expression via variation in tone. However, they have since opened up a lot. Now it is easier to bow near the fingerboard and activate the string quietly. At first I felt trapped into pushing towards the bridge for every note, just to get it to speak. There is a limit to how aggressively you crank on these strings, especially on the low end. You can’t bend the string to your will with crushing down bows. It won’t respond the same way, it certainly won’t give you the sound you want. There is a lot more subtlety to be explored in the sound and the technique.

Detail 2: Here you can see the “ball end” with cushy “washer” on the a-string. My a-string was and friction peg were fighting the tension a bit when I had it threaded underneath (like the d-string). So after a week, I switched to saddling it in the fine-tuner and it hasn’t given me any trouble since. This may have to do with the added downward tension behind the bridge when threading in the tailpiece vs saddling in the fine-tuner – where it sits higher. I looped the low strings, because they held tension better and were more secure on my cello that way. You can keep it simple though, and thread all of the strings like I have the d-string, just let the knot catch on the underside of the tailpiece.

Pros / Cons

Pros

The tone is incredible (see video above). Many of my adult students (and student parents) being more familiar with what a cello sounds like, immediately remark at the Eudoxa’s beauteous sound. With a nice ebony wood tail piece and the gut string set up, it feels like I turned on a super wet reverb inside the cello!

Gut strings have been the sound of bowed string instruments for centuries! Steel strings only came into prominence in the 20th century during WWII when sheep gut was hard to come by. Playing on gut puts you in touch with centuries of tradition and helps you understand the repertoire of the past (from 1940’s back to the 1600’s) in a deeper tactile way.

Eudoxas are uniquely flexible all the way up the fingerboard! I feel more relaxed when playing in thumb position. Planting the thumb and fingers down to the fingerboard two octaves up the A&D strings is easier to do than on steel.

The staccato and spiccato bow strokes sound is unreal on these strings. I truly feel I’ve never executed a proper sounding staccato or spicatto stroke until using gut. The bite is there, but it’s still a round note unlike steel where it can sound only like the bite and nothing else.

Pizzacato feels/sounds AMAZING. If you are a jazzer or get into chordal playing, definitely give these strings a try. It makes me feel like I’m playing fretless bass guitar, Jaco style. Pizz has never sounded so lush on my cello!

Shifting is very enjoyable and fun to do on this set up (which I can’t say for most strings).

Eudoxa strings are not as expensive as one might think! A full set of Eudoxa is about $250, whereas an equivalent set of Larsen Magnacore (steel) or Thomasitik Versum (steel) runs about $350-$400. These are professional, high end strings used by such greats as Isseralis and Jacqueline du Pré. While Du Pre was transitioning from plain gut to steel strings, she used Eudoxa C4, G3 and Prim (steel) d2, a1 – as you can see and hear in the video below. Again, if Eudoxa is good enough for THE Jacqueline du Pré, they are good enough for little ole me!

Cons

The obvious one (no getting around it) – gut strings have a longer break in period. New steel Larsen Magnacore strings are said to break in within an hour. It has taken two full weeks for my Eudoxa strings to settle up-to pitch and into tension. I spent hours playing in the strings everyday, tuning constantly throughout each session. My (friction) peg tuning skills have much improved as a result! – Update: For this entire 3rd week I haven’t had to peg tune my strings once, they have held steady at A=440Hz! Wohoo!

More subject to temperature and humidity changes.

Animals definitely died in the making of these strings… they are not vegan-cellist friendly.

The Intonation Game

Sometimes it feels like you are chasing intonation around the fingerboard for the first couple of weeks. The strings are all going out of tune at slightly different rates. Because the strings are thicker, rolling your finger from back to front results in a much larger sweep of pitch. There is a bit of retraining for how to place the finger and correct the intonation. Some of these issues are break-in period ones. Now that the strings have settled in and relaxed, it feels mostly back to normal when placing and adjusting the finger to achieve good intonation.

I could foresee a couple of issues for some players/cellos in respects to the low strings: they may feel too chunky; be slow to speak; have overpowering bassy low end; not bright enough lows for your instrument to cut through; vibrate too widely for your string spacing (I can get the C string to vibrate so widely that it hits my G string!); have trouble getting the edgy tone that one can get from a tungsten wound steel string.

My one tonal complaint is with the aluminum winding on the a1 string. It sometimes sounds tooooo much like aluminum. You get a gross sound sometimes when you portamento. The toothy crunching crinkle winding-tone comes out harshly if you don’t get the bow tilt and placement just right, especially without enough rosin on.

The sweet spot on a gut string during the break in period seems to be very specific. If you aren’t listening to the physical feed back loop of the string<>bow interaction, you’ll get a false sounding note, or it may not even speak at all. Certain high register notes are particular to speak; some of the wolf-tone notes of a string can go false or simply disappear on you – if one is not using the proper bow speed, placement, pressure/weight, tightness.

Wound gut strings demand respect from you, the player. With both left hand pitch and point-of-contact for the bow – the feeling is similar to having a feral cat or rescue dog in the house for the first time. You can’t necessarily predict how they will react and behave so you are on your toes, more ready for a slew of possible outcomes. With steel strings, it’s more like having a domesticated dog or cat, you can predict fairly accurately how they will behave in each situation.

On many cellos, the strings may be too wide/thick for your bridge &/or nut – you may need to get those re-cut or altered by a luthier.

Winding Up

The first recording I ever heard of the Bach cello suites was by Pau Casals. These recordings from the late 1930’s were given to me by my Classical teacher Janet Marshall. She was part of the generation of cellists following after Casals in the mid 20th Century. Both Casals and Marshall had an incredibly powerful yet simultaneously beautiful sound. When I play on this Eudoxa gut string set up, I feel that the sound of Casals comes out of my cello. I hear all of those lessons with Janet playing back in my head, how she sang phrases and demonstrated passages with the highest passion and musicality. Playing on these strings feels like being home.

In Part 2 I will review a Full Set of Eudoxa Meduim Gauge strings. Stay tuned and Happy Practicing!

Brian

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11/12 | ‘Seasons of Change’ Wellness Retreat @ Blue Mounds Dharma Center

Cultivate Equanimity During Seasons of Change

Sun, 11/12 @ Blue Mounds Dharma Center

2979 Main St, Blue Mounds, WI 53517

$80 10:30am-5:00pm

Email Shannel to register!  ymassageyoga@gmail.com

We had a fantastic response from both attendees and practitioners last time we held our Seasons of Change wellness retreat.  ~ Are you over due for a check-in with your mind and body?  ~ Looking for an opportunity to spend a day taking care of yourself?  Then this is a perfect day retreat for you!  Blue Mounds Dharma Center is an open, relaxed space set into the gorgeous forested crags of Blue Mounds, WI.  Join us to practice and learn something new about Zen mindfulness, Chinese guqin zither music, yoga, acupressure, and movement meditation.  Email Shannel (yoga instructor, ymassage) to reserve your spot!

download itinerary pdf


 

11/3 | InDIGenous Jazz Series: Nestle and Lovely Socialite @ Wisconsin Union Theater

Fri, 11/3 | Free! Doors Open 7:00p

@ Wisconsin Union Theater

800 Langdon St, Madison, WI 53706

Nestle (Album Release)

Lovely Socialite

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from GMJC: Concerts of fresh original music, in a great listening room, with no cover charge. That’s what music fans will find at the UW Memorial Union’s Frederic March Play Circle on four Friday evenings this Fall as the Greater Madison Jazz Consortium (GMJC), Madison Music Collective and Wisconsin Union Theater present the sixth season of “InDIGenous Jazz”, a series that showcases music composed and performed by our community’s finest jazz musicians.


Nestle: Leading off this double-header concert is the experimental trio Nestle, which includes local bassist Rob Lundberg, in the premiere performance of their new GMJC-commissioned suite, “Bird Song.” This unique new suite uses archived sounds from the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology as the music’s primary generative element. In addition to Mr. Lundberg, Nestle members include Twin Ports-based guitarist Cyrus Pireh and Chicago-based percussionist and electronics artist Ryan Packard. They’ve been together as a band for two years and have developed a flexible free-flowing turn-on-a-dime improvisational rapport.

Lovely Socialite: The second set features the quirky Madison-based sextet Lovely Socialite whose bold and intricate compositions combine the aesthetics of modern jazz with contemporary classical, driving rock, and hip hop. Often compared to Frank Zappa & The Mothers of Invention, its members include Corey Murphy (Trombone, Electronics), Abe Sorber (Vibraphone, Drums), Pat Reinholz (Electric Cello, Electronics), Brian Grimm (Pipa, Gaohu, Guzheng, Cello, Electronics), Ben Willis (Double Bass, Electronics), and Mike Koszewski (Drums, Percussion). For this concert, they will perform works composed by the band’s members over the past few years.



Nestle Bio:
The Nestle trio exists in performance.
The Nestle trio is listening.
The Nestle trio is a realization of visions.
The Nestle trio is an expression of being through doing.

The Nestle trio of Robert Lundberg, Ryan Packard, and Cyrus Pireh respectively assemble an instrumentation of double bass and electronics; percussion, accordion, and electronics; and 9-string electric future lute.

To live and thrive in the current situation invokes a certain music: not a music to put on as background or a music to wear as a shirt or badge and gain entry into social sets.

A music that is the result of doing.
A music that is the result of people.
A music that exists as proof of existence.

Lovely Socialite Bio:
Lovely Socialite, formerly Lovely Socialite Mrs. Thomas W. Phipps, is a Milwaukee/Madison-based six-piece that combines the aesthetics of modern jazz with contemporary classical, driving rock, and hip hop. Lauded for their bold and intricate compositions, the group often draws comparisons to Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention. The band’s original music combines strict notation with moments of improvisation and maintains a healthy balance of dark and heavy rock grooves with quirky jazz obscurities.

While Lovely Socialite’s unusual mix of strings, traditional Chinese instruments, brass, and a jazz rhythm section suggest that the group might be a contemporary music ensemble, it is their use of stomp boxes, vocal processors, and other electronics that makes the group a suitable fit for any rock, hip-hop, or jazz bill. In fact, Lovely Socialite has been privileged to share the stage with such artists as Dessa, of Minneapolis hip-hop collective Doomtree, as well as performing live on the UW Madison Terrace with Brian Ritchie of the Violent Femmes.

In October of 2015, Lovely Socialite released their second full length album. Nearly two years in the making, “Toxic Consonance” was recorded at Blast House Studios in Madison with Landon Arkens. “Toxic Consonance” represents an edgier and more mature version of the band than their previous endeavor, “Registers Her Delight” (2012), and features extensive production efforts mixing found sounds, vocal samples, and electronic effects into their live-style recording.

Promotional Cosponsor: Terra Incognita