“In the Practice Room” Bass Guitar No.1!

Replacement + Position Shift Fingering Exercise on Root 4th 5th in each position

This fall I switched back to standard 4ths tuning on my bass guitars. I had been playing bass guitar tuned in 5ths (an octave lower than cello) for the last 7 years!! So it’s been a totally mind bender to relearn the fretboard in 4ths. 🤪 Transitioning back really makes me appreciate all of the great things about a 4ths tuning system. Truth be told, I hadn’t been practicing bass much in the past 5 or so years, I’ve mostly been focused in on cello. But! Changing my tuning back to 4ths is forcing me to practice 😁 So! Every time I practice, I create multiple exercises and then work on it until I have it in the hands. Sometimes it is hyper focused on a certain technique or theory, but other times it is free spirited. This one came out of pure improvisation, and it is a finger twister! The concept is to play Root 5th 4th in the hand (ex 1 3 1) then Root 5th 4th again but as a 1×2 extension where 2nd finger replaces 3 (or stays put if already extended) in order to shift up a position to play the 4th on the lower string with your 4th finger (1×2 / 4). Then you are a up in the next position and can start the climbing cycle all over again! The key to this exercise is to lift 1st finger off the board when you are on 2nd finger and about to shift up, leading with the 4th finger. Good Luck!

You can purchase the sheet music for this exercise above and hear my play through the exercise (1) slow and staccato and (2) trying it out a little faster in the Instagram post below!

#bassguitar #etude #bassguitarexercises #bassguitarlesson #musiclessons #musicexercise #fingeringexercise #inthepracticeroom #briangrimmcellozone #cellozone #briangrimm #remoteteaching #remotelessons

“6 Ways to Improve Your Bow Grip”

Whether you are one of my students and we are currently working on your bow grip, or you are someone who has difficulty controlling the bow and feeling comfortable with your grip, or you are another cello teacher looking for additional exercises to send to your students for bow grip help – this video is for you!! Here are 6 ways to improve your bow grip. So grab your bow, tighten it up and join me in the #CelloZone for this #TechniqueTip#PlayAlong video!

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Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, I am unable to perform live, which has significantly hurt my income. In the mean time, I am putting more effort into online lesson content, in hopes to help as many aspiring cellists as I can. If you learned something valuable from these exercises or they helped you with your technique, consider making a one-time donation. Your contribution really helps me to continue producing content and putting energy into this project.

If you don’t take private lessons from me, but consistently come back to my site on a regular basis to learn helpful tips about how to practice, work on healthier technique, and discover music theory on your instrument… please consider making monthly donations! It will help me to continue providing quality online lesson content.

If you clicked on this tab, you are my hero! If you want to help me sustain quality online lesson content, please consider making a yearly donation! Your donations ensure that I can afford to spend the time to produce this online lesson material.

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TIMESTAMPS

@00:00 it begins…
@00:23 intro and helpful tips
@02:07 EXERCISE 1 – Bounce the Ball
@02:48 who dat?!?!
@05:05 EXERCISE 2 – Wave Motion
@07:25 EXERCISE 3 – Placement of Thumb
@08:24 Traditional Flat Thumb Style
@09:15 Modern Hooked or Bent Thumb Style
@12:05 Wrist Tips
@13:41 Waterfall Fingers
@15:05 who dat again?!?!
@16:01 Placement of other Fingers
@19:03 EXERCISE 4 – Bow Circles “Pool Stick”
@19:31 DO NOT USE “pointy from behind” pokey grip
@20:14 Lean In, pouring water from a pitcher
@22:11 EXERCISE 5 – Down Wrist, Up Wrist
@23:28 Wave / Energy Principle
@25:11 Train Wheel Imagery
@25:33 EXERCISE 6 – Open String Whole Bows
@25:59 Ellipse or Oval Bowing
@27:28 REVIEW
@29:53 discussion of multiple bow grips
@32:16 whhhhhaaaatttt???!?!? who dat again, again!?


instagram: @bgcellozone https://www.instagram.com/bgcellozone/
facebook: @cellozone https://www.facebook.com/CelloZone/


#CelloZone #BowGrip #CelloClub #CelloLessons #Cello #Violoncello #PlayAlong #RemoteLessons #Music #MusicLessons #CelloLessons #BrianGrimmCelloZone #TechniqueTips #CelloTechnique #CelloClub

“In the Practice Room” No.1 – New Fingering Exercise!

15 Fingering Variations for A C D E sul D at the Shoulder

🛒 Buy the downloadable PDF Sheet Music! 👉


On Monday morning I woke up feeling exhausted and groggy, a hangover due to all of the emotion and tension surrounding the Presidential Election. I knew that I needed to get a good practice session in before I started teaching lessons in order to get my brain and body recalibrated. Practicing musical instruments is my meditation. Music is my Religion. It’s my mental health practice and how I perform works of good and service to my community. Normally when I sit down in the Practice Room, I start creating. It’s an improvisation that stems from a simple idea – usually some concept/technique that I need to work on – and then it grows organically from there into an exercise or system which I can play around in. I’ve been doing this since I can remember practicing. Starting in grade school, I’d always sit down, improvise and just explore the instrument and technique. It makes the Practice Room fun, creative, and exploratory – I highly encourage you to try it!

The resulting meditation on Monday is this new fingering exercise for to work on the evenness of tone and intonation no matter which fingering you may choose for a series of notes in a given passage. In this example I chose a few notes on the D string, which transition from the neck of the instrument to just over the shoulder [ A C D E ]. It’s a transition of technique that cellists are required to do often and something that I have been focusing on in the past few years. I want as many tools in my technique arsenal as I can collect to help me conquer the geography of this tricky section of the cello. There are immense possibilities of fingerings due to the overlap of neck position chromatic hand shapes and diatonic thumb position (& shoulder position) style hand shapes combined with the physical barrier of the instrument’s shoulder force us to choose when and how to transition between fingering styles. It’s an exercise in possibility.

Each line in the sheet music is progression through a system of fingering for the same notes A C D E. There are 15 fingerings here for you to try.


It’s hard for any Classical musician to show imperfection to the outside world, when the genre is so incredibly strict about presenting your highest level of playing possible. But social media to me is an opportunity to share our Process and Practice with each other. I love the sound of other people practicing. One of my favorite things to do in college was just walk by the practice rooms to hear people working on spots. Sometimes I’d politely pop my head in to ask about what they were working on. Everyone develops their own unique methods and techniques of practice, which I find fascinating. I’d love to see more people sharing how they Practice on social media, instead of only showing their most polished clips!

So in that spirit, here’s an Instagram post that is was my first full, continuous run through of this new exercise. It’s by no means perfect and it’s certainly not meant to be! It’s my starting point with a new exercise that I’ve just created. In this clip, I’m Meditating as much as possible, not thinking or trying, just observing. I do this to get out of my own way and simply notice what my natural tendencies are for these shifts. Which fingerings come easy? Which shifts am I missing? Is it just one finger in particular that is the problem? Or is it one position as a whole that isn’t locked in? I just want to collect the data, without judgement. Then from this initial run, I know exactly what to work on for the rest of the week as I practice this exercise. I can really target specific positions and fingerings based on what I have observed about my natural tendencies.


This meditation/practice concept should be used often as a way to separate your emotion and potential frustration from your playing. We need to be able to fail over and over and over and over again in the Practice Room. It needs to be a safe space for errors and “mistakes”. It’s precisely the mistakes that arise which become of value, because the mistakes let you know what you really need to work on. It takes the guess work out of the equation.

So fail, observe, and make small incremental changes in order to improve your playing (and mindset!). Once you nail it, keep on repeating it for consistency, accuracy, expression and muscle/spatial memory.

I’ll be updating with a couple of different versions of this exercise. For example, alternate bowings, different expression prompts, doing it in the same position but on the A string, etc.

Try out this new exercise and let me know what you think! Which fingering was the most helpful for you? Which was the most natural for you? Which did you struggle with the most? Have you noticed any tendencies about certain fingers or positions and the accuracy of your intonation?

Hopefully you will learn a little bit about your own playing this way! Happy Practicing!
~ Brian


#InthePracticeRoom #cello #violoncello #cellotheory #cellotechnique #cellofingerings #cellolessons #celloclub #cellozone #remotelessons #music #musiclessons

Ennio Morricone Tribute: “Gabriel’s Oboe” by The Brothers Grimm + Dedications

Ennio Morricone‘s music has brought profound beauty into my life. In this video The Brothers Grimm pay tribute to the prolific Italian film composer, who passed away this year on July 6th, 2020. “Gabriel’s Oboe” is one of the hallmark pieces from his soundtrack to the 1986 film, “The Mission”. About a year ago, I had an emotionally intense performance of this piece, which has forever changed the meaning it holds in my life (read on below).

I first heard Morricone’s soundtrack for The Mission (1986) while I was studying composition in college. I was struck by the simplicity of the musical themes mixed with clever orchestration to leverage emotional climbs. I also loved that the sound of the symphony orchestra was blended together with traditional instruments of the Guaraní tribe to create such a wide ranging sonic and emotional journey. Awe and Divine Inspiration, Pain and Devastation, Unconditional Giving vs Inexcusable Wrong Doings, the Great Contradictions that reach across time are all present here. And as a cello player, it didn’t hurt that the two main themes, “Gabriel’s Oboe” and “The Falls” showed up as the first two pieces on the album, “Yo-Yo Ma Plays Ennio Morricone“. As the movie deals with events tied to racism, slavery, and religious subjugation in 1700’s South America, so will this memorial dedication meditate on grief in modern America around the persisting systems of Racism.

A special thank you to my brother AJ, who took time out of his busy end-of-semester college teaching schedule in Tokyo, Japan to record this piece with me virtually.

I will always have a special place for this music in my heart , thank you Ennio Morriconne
~ Brian Grimm

For the full length dedication to friends & families from my home town community who have lost loved ones in the past year, plus a dedication to the Black Lives Matter movement and the communities across the country who have lost their loved ones due to the ongoing American tragedy of Racism (with some options for donating to the cause); read on to the end…


Why I will be inextricably linked to this piece for the rest of my days

Last year, while in the middle of teaching cello lessons, I received a phone call from a man who had just lost his 12 year old daughter, Anna. She loved music and played french horn, but her favorite instrument was the cello. He asked me if I would come to Iowa that Saturday to play at her funeral. Of course I said yes, it would be my honor to do so. I have many students around that age and I couldn’t help but think of how sad it’d be to lose any one of them. My original plan was to head over to Iowa on Saturday to play for Anna’s funeral and then head to Chicago on Sunday to visit my Grandma Nerren. She had been in the hospital for over a week at that point and it wasn’t looking good, so I wanted to go down and play cello for her one last time.

On Saturday morning, just as I was heading out of the door to drive 4 hours and play for a 12 year old girl’s funeral – that’s when I received the call from my mother that Grandma had passed away in the night. I was devastated. I summoned my strength and concentration to make the long drive, alone, to play the funeral. Towards the end of Anna’s service, I played “Gabriel’s Oboe” by Ennio Morriconne. It was the most emotionally raw ‘performance’ I’ve ever given, I barely made it through that piece without falling apart. It was everything I could do to hold on and just play to the end. I was playing of course for Anna, who was loved so much by her family, but simultaneously I was playing for my grandma, Therese – saying good bye to her with my heart through a musical prayer. It was heavy. After the service, I found a pew in the church and had myself a good, long, messy cry. It was a very tough 4 hour drive to get back home afterwards.

About a week later, my Mom’s family gathered in Orland Park, IL for my grandma’s funeral. It was bittersweet, but we were all able to be there together to share our love for the matriarch of our family. At the service, my brother AJ and I played “Gabriel’s Oboe” together on guitar and cello. It felt so nice to have AJ’s guitar supporting my cello melodies, especially after having to do that piece solo at Anna’s funeral the week before. We don’t get to play together much anymore, so that made it even more special to me that we could play for Grandma, which she always loved.

After Grandma’s funeral, we were all heading over to the cemetery, next to the church where she had been baptized 96 years ago, to lay her to rest with the rest of her family buried there. On the drive over to the cemetery, we heard Saint-Saëns “The Swan” on the radio, which AJ and I had played at her memorial service, just minutes before. After the family luncheon we headed back to the funeral home to pick up our instruments and go over to Grandma’s house to continue spending some quality time together. My parents pulled the car up to me and my brother in the parking lot and rolled down their window, “Gabriel’s Oboe” was playing on the radio. It seemed that Grandma was letting us know that she was there at the service and had heard it all; our elegies, poems, tears, and music & she was giving some love back down to earth to comfort us in that moment as we said goodbye one last time.


Dedications of this performance to Friends and Families from my community

There are a number of families from my hometown church and music communities who have lost family members this past year. This performance is dedicated to:

The Sevallius, Finke, Zajdel & Rittmann families who I grew up with at church. To Erin and David who lost their sister and Jackie who lost her daughter, Alaina this year. This one stopped me in my tracks when I found out (directly before a gig), I was shocked and saddened to hear of Alaina’s death. It’s hard to comprehend a loss such as this seeing as she was still so young and leaves behind a family. Also that it should come so close on the heels of losing a grandfather & father, Bill Finke last year. I’ll always remember Bill’s big smile & laugh and how Alaina kept us younger kiddos in line, she always felt like a big sis to me.

To Katie, Jason & Joe Rohn who just recently lost their father, Gary. He was kind of like a gentle giant to me growing up, it was always a pleasure to talk with him. You all have the best laughs and I can rarely think of a time that we weren’t laughing together! So it is especially hard to know that you are all going through the pain of losing a father.

And to the show stopping, dynamic comedic entertainer Nick Daering, who AJ and I both had so many good times with over the years, I was very sorry to hear about the loss of your father this year. We’ve been thinking about you buddy and are long over due for a proper catch up!

To one of the sweetest people I know, Sarah Jane, who was my stand-partner in high school orchestra, I was sorry to hear of the loss of your mother, Theresa, last year. I know she faced many challenges throughout her life and that she was very special to you. I can’t believe it’s already been a year, time seems to slip through my fingers these days.

I had the honor of playing cello at both Sarah and Katie’s weddings in past years, I’m glad that I was able to be a part of those joyous occasions.

And to another one of my cello stand-partners in WAYO, Andrea and her mother Lauren Beale, who lost their father/husband Marshall last year. Again, I can’t believe it’s already been over a year and I know the relationship with that grief starts to evolve and change after that ‘year of firsts’. I’m especially sorry that he won’t be around to see Gabriel continue to grow and share those experiences with you. I’m glad our families have shared so much good music together over the years.

Andrea and I had the same private cello teacher, Janet Marshall, who passed away in November of 2019. Janet, I owe you so much and there aren’t enough words to describe the impact you had on my life! I will love and miss you forever, you were like a grandma to me.

To my bandmate Chad Canfield and his family who lost his Grandma this year, I know she played a huge part in your life. Rest assured my friend that she’s keeping watch over you and Marcus too.

My heart goes out to all of you and your family members, grief can come in waves and be unpredictable. You’ve all played a meaningful part in my life, so AJ and I would like to dedicate this music to you.


Dedications of this performance to the Black Lives Matter movement

All of the people listed above were folks from my own community that I grew up with, but my mourning doesn’t just stop at the edges of my personal community. My heart also goes out to anyone who is still mourning the unnecessary deaths of the recently taken, like Elijah McClain, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Atatiana Jefferson, Aura Rosser, Stephon Clark, Botham Jean, Philando Castile Alton Sterling, Michelle Cusseaux, Freddie Gray, Janisha Fonville, Sandra Bland, Walter Scott, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Eric Garner and many countless others. I dedicate this performance to you, your families, and your local communities. I hope this music can bring to you a moment of comfort, whether brief or lasting, and a reflective remembrance of a loved one’s impact on your life.

To anyone in the white community at large and specifically anyone from the community where I grew up: if you are having a hard time understanding why we have needed a movement like Black Lives Matter or your immediate reaction is to reject the movement, I challenge you to open your heart and find an empathetic understanding through grief. Grief is a universal human experience. Whatever grief I feel when we have lost a loved one in my community is the same grief I feel when I hear about someone in the black community loosing their brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts, fathers and mothers, sons and daughters due to the many persisting systems of Racism. Especially when many black people are struck down so publicly and without hesitation by those sworn to protect. However the communal grief and mourning surrounding these deaths is compounded by generation after generation after generation after generation after generation after generation of unjust and unfair treatment from the white community and the US government and law enforcement and the legal system and housing discrimination and education discrimination and lack of employment opportunities and food inequity and all of the systems of racism woven into the fabric of this country. No matter how hard I might try to imagine, I can never truly understand the depth of grief a black person feels in these situations. But as is clear by the family and friends dedication listed up above, every community loses their loved ones – and for white people who don’t yet understand that Black Lives Matter: grief and community-mourning is certainly one way to begin to understand what the African American community goes through every time there’s another public murder of one of their community members (especially when those responsible not held to account). All of the people we’ve lost this way are family members too, not just some abstract black person that the news media chooses to paint one way or the other. Their absence causes a heavy ripple effect, touching many lives, just as losing anyone in your community does.

White people need to step up and do the work. White people need to seek out ways to listen & learn so we can create lasting, positive, anti-racist change within our communities and professions. I am saying all of this as a white person who has lived with immense privileges. This message is for me too, there’s always room for improvement and growth. We have to keep the conversation going and continue to put in the work.

I believe in the power of beautiful music such as Ennio Morricone’s to bring positive change in this world. If you agree and appreciate the performance of this piece that AJ and I have given, I encourage you to donate to any of the following organizations or any Black Lives Matter related causes you know of which will impact your community directly.


Donate to and Resource directly from Black Lives Matter (Global): https://blacklivesmatter.com/

Donate & Support Freedom Inc. (Madison): https://freedom-inc.org/index.php

Donate & Support Movement Fund (Madison): https://www.movementfund.com/
Follow and Support Young Gifted & Black YGB Ferguson To Madison

Donate & Support ACLU Wisconsin (WI): https://www.aclu-wi.org/

Donate & Support BLOC Black Leaders Organizing for Communities (Milwaukee): https://populardemocracy.org/our-partners/black-leaders-organizing-communities

Donate & Support I Will Not Die Young (Milwaukee): http://www.iwillnotdieyoungcampaign.com/home

Donate & Support Love on Black Women: https://loveonblackwomen.com/

Buy a United T-Shirt or Hoodie from Passions Just Like Mine collective, 100% proceeds go to the official Gianna Floyd Fund: https://passionsjlm.com/

Are you a Classical Music Teacher? Or have a student learning Violin instruments?
Donate to and Buy Sheet Music from Music by Black Composers (classical): https://www.musicbyblackcomposers.org/

Donate to and learn from Decolonizing the Music Room: https://decolonizingthemusicroom.com/


There’s one race, the human race
and we’ve got to work together to make tomorrow better.

1/7 | Celebrate Shackelford’s Last Jam & Kate’s BDay tonight @ the Mason Lounge

9pm – 12am No Cover | Five Points Jazz Collective Live at the Mason Lounge

416 S Park St, Madison, WI 53715

After 7 years of keeping the time in-line at the Mason Lounge every Tuesday night with the Five Points Jazz Collective, our drummer Eric Shackelford is stepping down. Come join us tonight to celebrate his seven years in service of the groove! Also, we’ll be celebrating the birthday of our fearless bartendress, Kate!

Eric the Shack-man pictured here staring a hole through your soul. The camera lens was injured in the taking of this photograph and was later re-tired. (photo by Matthew Norman)

It’s been so much fun playing bass in the Five Points Jazz Collective with Eric at the helm of the pocket. Famous for his “buh-da-dun dun dun, _ duh-nunt!” endings and exciting solos, Eric has been the bedrock of the the Five Points sound for 7 years! In that time, Eric and I have developed what I would describe as an effortless groove. It’s easy and it just goes… You don’t have to think about it or calculate, you simply play. And for me, that’s when it’s really fun. If I ever throw a funky surprise at Eric, he’s ready to catch it and throw it right back at me. And when it’s time for a drum-and-bass-trade during solos, I know things are gonna get interesting because of his careful listening and conversational style. In fact, some of my favorite memories during my time with “the Tuesday Night Squad” have been those drum’n bass trades!

Drawing of Eric Drumford’n Sons on New Year’s Eve 2020 by master John Ribble, Crawdaddy of Five Points violinist Rin Q Ribble!

A versatile drummer, Eric also plays heavy in the blues trio Aaron Williams and the Hoodoo. It’s actually not common nowadays to play with a Jazz drummer who can bust out a solid blues style. Well, Eric’s got a whole bag of blues baby. I’ve always enjoyed hearing the blues side of jazz come out in The Shack’s playing. Sometimes just for a chorus during a solo, always in good taste.

One of my favorite memories playing with Eric and the Five Points Jazz Collective happened this past Fall 2019, when we collaborated with Music con Brio at the Barrymore Theater (pictures below). It was a crashing together of worlds for me, because I also teach cello at Music con Brio! Eric did such a fantastic job playing fun drum beats to fit the children’s songs and the kids had a great time. The cello group’s favorite moment was performing the surf-rock edition of “Drunken Sailor”!

Eric has the unique gift of an experienced drummer who know’s how to play-the-room. It’s a rare thing indeed for a drum set player to keep the volume at a low, manageable level yet also hold up the energy and create an exciting group sound. The Shack-man has always found the sweet spot at the Mason Lounge and never overplays the room. Quite a feat! This is but one of the many reasons why Eric will be leaving some big shoes to fill for the next drummer of the Five Points!

We tip our hats to you Eric and raise a glass… or two or three. We’ll miss you and your drumming at the Mason Lounge each week. It’s been a blast and we cherish the friendship & music we’ve created with you over the last 7 years!

We wish you the best!
from solid-blue-Brian, the Five Points Jazz Collective & The Mason Lounge


9/20 | Musique Concrète élégie “They’re Still Here” by BC Grimm now available for download, honoring loved ones who’ve passed


They’re Still Here” Liner Notes

Composed, Recorded and Premiered in August of 2018 by BC Grimm (b 1986) for the 2018 Madison New Music Festival. All instruments performed by BC Grimm. Available for Download on September 20th, 2019 to mark one year since Grandma Joyce’s passing. This release is also in remembrance my Grandma Nerren who passed away this summer, her 97th birthday would have been on September 17th. Much love to both my Grimm and Nerren families.

[About the Work]
Those who have passed away continue to pop up in the everyday moments of our lives. This work explores the modern dichotomy of navigating grief and mourning whilst carrying on with your work day and life obligations. You’ll hear field recordings of my day-to-day experience fused with instrumental composition and sound design. These “scenes” reference and even recreate real life moments I had in 2018 while in the wake of a series of close friend and family deaths. Many scenes are embedded with inside jokes or nods to the loved ones who passed. In addition, some scenes imagine what may be taking place for the dying at the transition between this world and the next. I felt that I didn’t give myself permission to truly process my grief publicly when this was all happening – how many of us are quietly carrying around these feelings at the same time?

A month after the premier of this work, I felt like I’d had a chance to process and contextualize my feelings and was scheduled to perform the piece a second time on 9/20/2018. Ironically, that was the day my Grandma Joyce passed away and the themes of this piece played out in front of me once again, in real time. I received “the call” right before leaving for work in the morning and had 3 jobs to work that day… run to the next run to the next run to the next. But on that day, I told everyone of the news I’d just heard and what I was going through internally. It helped me to get through that day without breaking down. I just couldn’t believe it had happened again, like clockwork. I’d like to thank Taralie Peterson, who performed a set of free improvisation as a duet with me that night. It was the first time that whole day I was able to let out and explore my feelings about my Grandmother’s passing.

[Dedications]
The 2018 composition, recording and performance of “They’re Still Here” is dedicated in loving memory to Patrick Kelly, Ross Sutherin & Brian White-Stout and to the Grimm, Sutherin, Kelly, Morrow, White-stout & Brethauer families. I’d like to dedicate the 2019 public releasing of this music to my Grandma Joyce & Grandma Nerren, and to my Nerren and Grimm families. Both grandmas passed away in the last year since the making of this piece. I miss you both very much and think of you often when I play cello now.

[Album Art]
A special heartfelt thank you to one of my Art heroines growing up, Aunt Jean (daughter of Grandma Joyce) who made the Album Art for this release. I’m so glad we were able to collaborate on this special project.

[On Listening]
“They’re Still Here” is meant to be listened to and contemplated in one continuous sitting. Therefore the movements haven’t been separated, to facilitate the best listening experience (as it was performed live).


PROGRAM NOTES

[00:00] SCENE I “Passing of a Friend, The Work Day Begins”
Tenor Viola da Gamba with field recording

[02:31] SCENE II “News Cycle On Fire: Rbt. Mueller’s Lonely Russia Probe”
Gaohu Cantonese fiddle with foley, field recording, 1940’s radio broadcast, singing bowls, violoncello, dizi flute, bawu flute, xiao flute, sheng mouth organ

[04:25] SCENE III “Do I Tell The Children? No, Teach On.”
Violoncello with field recording, pipa lute, tenor viola da gamba, contracello

[06:27] SCENE IV “Fluorescence Hums The Harmonic Order of Nature”
APC40 (electric hum in Just Intonation)

[10:31] SCENE V “Morning Routine, Scrambled Brains”
Field Recording with foley

[13:00] SCENE VI “A Call With My Brother, Wise Counsel”
*Sarangi-Cello in pipa tuning with claps, cajon, Tyler’s motorcycle

[14:55] SCENE VII “Ask The Corn Spirits”
Bawu flute with gaohu fiddle

[17:28] SCENE VIII “Hermie’s Chimes, They’re Still Here”
Guqin Zither (tuned to Hermie’s chimes) with pipa lute, gaohu fiddle, dizi flute

[21:07] SCENE IX “Funeral Grave”
solo Violoncello

[22:22] SCENE X “Temple of Ancestors”
Sarangi-Cello in pipa tuning with pipa lute, synthesis

[24:29] SCENE XI “Transfigurations”
Guqin zither with pipa lute, Russian folk harp, singing bowls

[27:27] SCENE XII “Schoolyard in Snow; Children Play On”
Tenor Viola da Gamba, APC40 (electric hum in equal temperament), field recordings,
foley

  • “sarangi-cello” (d, g, a, d’) is tenor-violin (normally G, d, a, e’ or G, d, a, d’) tuned in pipa lute tuning with alternating wound and plain gut strings. I use a Nakatani-Kobo bow to help create a ‘sarangi-style’ on cello. The bowed Sarangi of North India and Pakistan is normally tuned to Sa=E (e, b, e’). I have my cello modeled after this tuning but a wholestep lower where Sa=D, where my guruji pt. Sugato Nag tunes his sitar. The sarangi has 3 melodic strings and the cello has 4, so I have tried a number of different tuning schemes and have settled on the Pipa Chinese lute tuning – as it is the most settled and advantageous one I have tried: d wound gut, g plain gut, a wound gut, d’ plain gut or silk. Alternate tunings I have used: (1) d, a, g, d’ (2) d, g, g, d’ (3) d, a, a, d’

6/11 | Isthmus Jazz Festival: Five Points Jazz Collective CD Release + Live Art!

Tues, 6/11, 9p-12a no cover @ The Mason Lounge
416 S Park St, Madison, WI 53715, USA
Isthmus Jazz Festival presents the
Five Points Jazz Collective CD Release show with Live Art!

“Don’t Worry About It” CDs $10

Entering Madison’s Mason Lounge for the first time, one immediately notices the quirks. The stuffed chicken in a henhouse in the wall, complete with straw. The action figures dangling from string, rigged up to move when someone opens the door to the restroom. The collection of neckties and paint can lids on the walls. Every element is so out of place, it somehow fits.

Like the décor, the Five Points Jazz Collective is quirky and disparate. Serving as the house band since the Mason opened in 2010, the Collective is an extended family of local musicians from varied backgrounds. Playing a mixture of jazz old and new, the group has evolved over the years from an open jam into a stable sextet with an increasingly large repertoire.

In its current incarnation, the group consists of Rin Ribble (violin), Eric Shackelford (drums), band leader Charlie Painter (guitar), Trey Grimm (keyboard), Kyle Rightley (trombone and euphonium), and Brian Grimm (bass and contracello). As Tuesday night regulars will attest, no two shows are ever alike. Listeners can expect to hear many subgenres of Jazz including swing standards, modal jazz, latin jazz, pop arrangements, blues, and funk.

Five Points at the Mason’s frozen back patio on set break – photo by Matthew Norman

About the CD Release

In collaboration with the Isthmus Jazz Festival, the Five Points Jazz Collective will be celebrating its first official album release! For 5 years the sextet version of this collective has played nearly 50 shows a year and decided it was time to lay down favorite selections of our vast catalogue. When listening to this debut album, you’ll feel the energy and spontaneity of the Five Points live sound with the buzzing atmosphere created by our regular fans. CDs and download cards will be available for sale at the show. Come grab your very own copy of this special recording captured live at the Mason Lounge!

Our CD Release will be made extra special with live visual artist contributions. Watch along as one of our most regular supporters John Ribble, plus special guest Jim McKiernan, create portraits of band members in real time to our music!

Live Drawing of me on bass at the Mason by John Ribble!

June 5th-9th, the 2019 LunART Festival is here!

The mission of LunART Festival is to support, inspire, promote, and celebrate women in the arts through public performances, exhibitions, workshops, and interdisciplinary collaboration; thus enriching our community and creating a welcoming space for learning and experimentation. This international art festival features engaging and accessible events and concerts in Madison, an educational program for emerging composers, as well as community building events for artists. LunART interweaves art forms throughout events, offering diverse and exciting programming, where creativity is queen!

Wed June 5, 6pm free | Overture Center for the Arts
Women Against Hate United By Love Gallery Reception

Join us for a Playhouse Gallery Reception from 6 PM – 8 PM!
Art Discussion with Kelly Parks Snider starts at 6:30 PM!

We are women united against hate. We are mothers, sisters, grandmother and caretakers. We are joined together purposely to shine a light, capture attention, and push back against injustice.

A collective effort of artists and activists, “Women Against Hate United by Love” is a platform, an entry point for a female-led anti-hate campaign united against bigotry, intolerance and racism. The creative building blocks for our artwork and messaging are women’s stories—powerful, tough, revealing stories of injustice, tragedy, strength, and amazingly, hope.


Thr June 6th, 9am free @ First United Methodist Church
From Page to Stage: Emerging Composers Masterclass

Free and open to the public!

The goal of “From Page to Stage” is to support emerging women composers in gaining a clearer understanding of not only expressing their creativity, but also creating clear scores, cultivating relationships with performers, and the art of collaboration. The master class with festival composer-in-residence Valerie Coleman will explore works submitted by participants, while talks about collaboration and the role of the independent composer will offer participants a well-rounded approach to growing their own careers.

Thr June 6th, 7pm $20 @ Maiahaus (402 E Mifflin St)
Only The Words Themselves – Opening Gala Concert

Join the LunART Festival in celebrating women in the arts with our opening gala concert. Featuring chamber music, poetry, monologues and aerial dancing, this concert will be a spectacular showcase of creativity by women artists!

Program:
Kirsten Volness little tiny stone, full of blue fire for flute/alto, clarinet/bass clarinet, violin & cello

Valerie Coleman, Tzigane for woodwind quintet

Barbara Strozzi, L’Astratto, Opus 8.04
Che si può fare, Opus 8.06

Hilary Tann, The Walls of Morlais Castle for oboe, viola & cello

Kate Soper, Only the Words Themselves Mean What They Say for flute & soprano

Special guests:
Andrea Musher – poet
Deborah Hearst – theatre artist
Linda DiRaimondo – aerial dancer + BC Grimm guqin zither


Fri June 7th, 6pm free @ Overture Center for the Arts
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman

What does it mean to create art as a woman in the 21st century, and how do our experiences shape what we produce and perform? Join us to hear stories of modern women and their unique personal journeys that led them to lives and careers in the arts.

This is a free pre-concert lecture that is open to the public. Stick around for the 7 PM concert Portraits of Josephine featuring an evening of music and dance.

Fri June 7th, 7pm $20 @ Overture Center for the Arts
Portraits of Josephine – Friday Gala Concert

Join us for a night of music and dance! Featuring a percussive string quintet by composer Edna Alejandra Longoria and a choreographed exploration of rhythm by dancer Liz Sexe & Kimi Evelyn, this concert will have you moving in your seat throughout the evening.

Program:

Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, Concerto for trumpet and five players

Valerie Coleman, Portraits of Josephine wind quintet

Edna Alejandra Longoria, Danzas Cautivas for string quintet & piano

Liz Sexe, Lone Sum: Part II (choreographed dance)

Stacy Garrop, My Dearest Ruth for soprano, violin, cello, clarinet & piano

Kimi Evelyn, She (choreographed dance)

Missy Mazzoli, The Sound of the Light for flute, violin, trumpet, trombone & piano

Fri June 7th, 9pm $7/$10 @ Robinia Courtyard
Holding Court – All Women Comedy Show

This lineup of amazing comedians is gonna be a stunner! Featuring local comics from the Midwest who are blazing a trail of funny that will leave you gasping in their wake. Come to the Robinia courtyard where these Queens will be “Holding Court.”

Featuring Vanessa Tortolano, Chastity Washington, Vickie Lynn, Samara Suomi & Cynthia Marie!


Sat June 8th, 10am free @ Madison Public Library
The Multi-Faceted Artist – Panel Discussion

This engaging panel discussion is for anyone interested in the ongoing trend and need for artists to wear multiple hats to succeed and thrive.

This panel will be held in the Bubbler Room of Madison Public Library Central. Free and open to the public.

Led by Valerie Coleman-Page Flutist & Composer, Linda DiRaimondo & Katrin Talbot

Sat June 8th, 2pm free @ Capitol Lakes
From Page to Stage: Emerging Composers Concert

We are extremely excited to welcome our 2019 participants to LunART’s educational program “From Page to Stage: Emerging Composers!” After attending masterclasses and workshops, these 6 talented composers will have their compositions performed by Madison musicians during this free concert at Capitol Lakes.

Program:

Emily Joy Sullivan – Dangerous Curves Ahead for violin, cello & piano

Claudia Sofía Alvarez Cuba – Nada queda (Nothing Left) for soprano & marimba

Shelby Scott – Going Thoughts for piano solo

Veronica Cator – Direction for string quartet

Anna Marcus-Hecht – Transfiguration for mezzo-soprano & piano

Nikea Randolph – Underground for wind quintet

Sat June 8th, 7pm $20 @ Furst Unitarian Society
Gaia – Closing Gala Concert

Join us for our final gala concert of the festival! This program will feature a wickedly upbeat clarinet & piano duo by Eunike Tanzil (who will be here to perform the piece herself!), Clara Schumann’s classic Piano Trio in G minor, and Valerie Coleman’s groundbreaking Afro-Cuban Concerto for wind quintet.

The ARTemis Women’s Choir returns for a second year and we’ll be featuring the artwork of women artists from Studio 84, Inc. and ARTWORKING, two nonprofit organizations that support artists with disabilities.

Full program:

ARTemis Women’s Choir:
Joan Szymko, Eli Eli
Meg Huskin, Oblivion
​Jocelyn Hagen, Moon Goddess
Alexandra Olsavsky, What Happens When a Woman?

Eunike Tanzil, Catching Time! for clarinet & piano

Clara Schumann, Piano Trio in G minor for violin, cello & piano

Valerie Coleman-Page Flutist & Composer, Afro-Cuban Concerto for wind quintet

Andrea Clearfield, Gaia for soprano, oboe & piano


Sun June 9th, 10am free @ Common Ground Middleton
Mooning Around – Poetry Reading and Artist Mixer

“Mooning Around” Poetry Reading and Artist Mixer – no better way to close our 2019 season! Join us for a performance of “One for Mileva Maric (Einstein)” by Andrea Musher, with special guests Sarah Whelan and Jackie Bradley, and poetry readings by The Line-Breakers: Andrea Potos, Eve Robillard, Rosemary Zurlo-Cuva & Katrin Talbot.

Enjoy your morning coffee and brunch while making creative connections with other artists. Open the public and all artists – bring your portfolios, business cards, and get creative!